Is there any good manners for family members to throw a graduation party?

A graduation is a celebration of the graduate’s accomplishments and gifts are not necessary. At a wedding or baby shower, the purpose of the party is to “shower” the recipients with items, so it might seem selfish if close family members are hosting showers.

QUESTION: I would like to organize a graduation party for my granddaughter. Two of my daughters, her aunts, want to help her. What do you think of the etiquette for family members hosting the event?

CALIE’S RESPONSE: I think he’s great and so nice! There’s no limit to who can throw a graduation party. That being said, make sure invitations go out early enough for out-of-town guests to accommodate.

LILLIE-BETH’S RESPONSE: I think it sounds wonderful for all of you to have a graduation party for your granddaughter/niece and I see no reason why that would be a problem in this case.

Following: Etiquette 20-40-60: disruptive children cause diner dilemma

A graduation is a celebration of the graduate’s accomplishments and although many people may bring gifts or cards, they are not required. At a wedding or baby shower, the purpose of the party is to “shower” the recipients with items for their new home or baby, so it might seem selfish if close family members are hosting showers (there are exceptions to this, of course). Classes). This distinction might explain your question and answer why you don’t have to worry. Just celebrate your graduation and have a great time!

HELEN’S RESPONSE: It’s so nice of you to want to organize the party for your precious granddaughter! I think it’s the perfect party and if her aunts want to help, that’s even better. Graduating from high school or college is so important and marks a milestone in a person’s life. Celebrate away! Congratulations to her on her graduation!

Following: 20-40-60 etiquette: avoid food disasters with a little planning

GUEST RESPONSE: Kathy Walker, Community Leader: When it comes to graduations, I think it’s only fitting for family members to host a celebration for the graduate in their family. After all, it is the family that has lovingly, emotionally, academically and financially supported the graduate for many years.

They are not only proud of the achievements of their graduates, they also congratulate themselves. This is the perfect time for multiple generations to come together and affirm the value of a good education and earning the coveted degree. Your friends and family will be honored to attend your gathering and toast whoever twirls their acorn!

Since 2009, Callie, Lillie-Beth and Helen have written this generational etiquette column. They also include responses from customers of a wide range of ages each week. So many years later, Callie is over 20; Lillie-Beth is over 40 and Helen is over 60. To ask an etiquette question, email [email protected]

This article originally appeared on Oklahoman: Is It Good Manners for Family Members to Host a Graduation Party?

Comments are closed.