Family service – Hilpers http://hilpers.org/ Wed, 18 May 2022 17:04:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hilpers.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Family service – Hilpers http://hilpers.org/ 32 32 Jewish Family Service partners with Two Somers Point Schools to provide counseling and therapy sessions for students https://hilpers.org/jewish-family-service-partners-with-two-somers-point-schools-to-provide-counseling-and-therapy-sessions-for-students/ Tue, 17 May 2022 11:36:06 +0000 https://hilpers.org/jewish-family-service-partners-with-two-somers-point-schools-to-provide-counseling-and-therapy-sessions-for-students/ Pictured L-R: Melanie Wagner, Vice Principal of Jordan Road School, Carleena Supp, Principal of Jordan Road School, Senior Director of Ambulatory Services at the Jewish Family Service, Dr. Naomi Jones, School District Superintendent of Somers Point, Dr. Michelle CarneyRay-Yoder, JFS Therapist Jessica Imperatore, and Jordan Road School Psychologist Carly Stranges cut the ribbon for the […]]]>

Pictured L-R: Melanie Wagner, Vice Principal of Jordan Road School, Carleena Supp, Principal of Jordan Road School, Senior Director of Ambulatory Services at the Jewish Family Service, Dr. Naomi Jones, School District Superintendent of Somers Point, Dr. Michelle CarneyRay-Yoder, JFS Therapist Jessica Imperatore, and Jordan Road School Psychologist Carly Stranges cut the ribbon for the new JFS Resource Center at the college. JFS therapists offer counseling and family therapy sessions to students at Dawes Avenue and Jordan Road Schools located in Somers Point. (Photo courtesy of Atlantic and Cape May Counties Jewish Family Service)

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The Jewish Family Service of Atlantic & Cape May Counties (JFS) and Somers Point School District have developed a partnership program to address the rising incidence of mental health issues, particularly among children and preteens.

With an increased awareness of anxiety, depression, peer pressure, grief and more in elementary and middle school children, the district now offers on-site individual and family therapy sessions in the Dawes Avenue and Jordan Road schools.

“Even more so since the start of the pandemic, mental health issues have come to the fore, especially among children who lacked social interaction due to the disruption of their daily routine. At JFS, we have provided in-person and telehealth therapy and counseling sessions to 224 children so far in 2022, and our agency has over 300 additional requests for counseling sessions for all ages,” said Naomi Jones, Ph.D., JFS Senior Director of Ambulatory Services. “Being able to partner with schools on Dawes Avenue and Jordan Road will allow JFS to offer onsite counseling sessions to those in need.”

JFS therapists Jessica Imperatore and Victoria Sinagria are available 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday, in elementary and middle schools.

All sessions are confidential, even those of school staff, unless the family allows communication between JFS and the school about their services.

JFS will track the number of people served and the number of individual, family and group sessions as well as the type of outing.

Additionally, the JFS Resource Center, located in Jordan Road School, will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday for group sessions.

In addition to individual and family therapy sessions, the program will offer educational and support groups as well as resources on relaxation and coping skills.

Financial support for the program was graciously provided by the U.S. Rescue Plan’s Elementary and Secondary Schools Emergency Relief Fund.


“As a district, we are thrilled to partner with Jewish Family Service to provide additional mental health support to our students and their families as we begin to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Dr. Michelle Carney-Ray-Yoder. “Our students will have a variety of support groups available during the day as well as individual counseling opportunities. In addition, focus groups will also be offered to students and their families. We look forward to a collaborative relationship with JFS to strengthen our school community.

For more information about JFS programs and services, including outpatient counseling services, contact 609.822.1108 or visit jfsatlantic.org.

About Jewish Family Service

Jewish Family Service of Atlantic and Cape May Counties (JFS) fosters strong families, thriving children, healthy adults, energetic seniors, and vibrant communities.

With dozens of program areas, JFS specializes in counseling, mental health services, homeless programs, professional services, adult and elder services, and also hosts a food pantry on square. The agency impacts 13,000 lives in Atlantic and Cape May counties each year.

JFS’s mission is to motivate and empower people to realize their potential and improve their quality of life. In keeping with Jewish values ​​and the spirit of tikkun olam (healing the world), JFS provides services with integrity, compassion, respect and professionalism, regardless of religion, race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity , their age or their origin.

For more information or to keep up to date with events and programs, visit JFS at jfsatlantic.org or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

About Dawes Avenue and Jordan Road Schools

Dawes Avenue Elementary and Jordan Road Middle Schools are located in the Somers Point School District.

For more information about the school district, visit https://www.sptsd.org.

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The COVID-19 crisis has amplified the need for the family services agency to focus on seniors | Good for Santa Barbara https://hilpers.org/the-covid-19-crisis-has-amplified-the-need-for-the-family-services-agency-to-focus-on-seniors-good-for-santa-barbara/ Sun, 15 May 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://hilpers.org/the-covid-19-crisis-has-amplified-the-need-for-the-family-services-agency-to-focus-on-seniors-good-for-santa-barbara/ [Noozhawk’s note: Third in a series sponsored by the Hutton Parker Foundation. Click here for the first story, and click here for the second.] One of the first orders of the day when the family service agency opened in 1899 was to provide food to needy families. More than 120 years later, food insecurity remains […]]]>

[Noozhawk’s note: Third in a series sponsored by the Hutton Parker Foundation. Click here for the first story, and click here for the second.]

One of the first orders of the day when the family service agency opened in 1899 was to provide food to needy families.

More than 120 years later, food insecurity remains a vital issue in Santa Barbara County and one that has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Many older members of the community, especially those who live alone, have been among the most affected.

The Family Services Agency is competent to help this population. The non-profit organization offers a number of services for seniors, designed to help seniors aged 60 and over live healthy and meaningful lives.

His abilities include Mental health and caregiver support, elder abuse case managementand one long-term care ombudsman (ASLD) program.

During the pandemic, the agency has stepped up its efforts, teaming up with local nonprofit partners to reach even more senior residents. The FSA led a consortium of 10 agencies who worked together to deliver food, medicine and other basic necessities to people living in aged care homes.

Partner agencies placed door hangers in seniors’ communities, and radio and TV spots told locked-in seniors how to get help. Private funders have supported this vital work, and the FSA reported that 28,687 older people received outreach and support services through the initiative.

“The pandemic has brought to light this often overlooked population in long-term care facilities,” said Marco Quintanar, supervisor of the FSA’s long-term care ombudsman program.

The ombudsman program advocates for older adults in licensed long-term care facilities to ensure they receive the highest quality of care and the best quality of life. Staff and volunteers make unannounced visits at least once a week, to observe and address any concerns.

Family Services Agency Volunteers
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Volunteers from the Family Service Agency help distribute food to seniors in the City of Santa Barbara Housing Authority. (Photo by Family Services Agency)

Yet during the pandemic, even mediators have been denied access. So, like almost everyone else, they turned to Zoom and relied on telephone and telehealth registrations, which cannot adequately replace the value of an in-person connection.

The agency is now back in person to conduct site visits, and perhaps no one is happier than Mike Leu, the longest-serving LTCO volunteer. An aerospace engineer by training and former reserve deputy sheriff, Leu has been with the program for more than 10 years.

He also has a law degree, and he told Noozhawk that the ombudsman volunteer opportunity appealed to him because it was a good match for his skills.

A big part of Leu’s volunteer efforts is talking with people, conducting surveys and solving problems. Many of the cases he sees are family financial abuse.

Last year, the Long-Term Care Ombudsman program served 3,201 residents of assisted living and long-term care facilities with quality of care issues, advance directives care and education on residents’ rights, as well as referrals to partner organizations.

At 75, Leu noted that he is older than some of the people he serves.

“I was looking for something useful to do in my retirement and wanted to help older people because I thought I was going in that direction,” he said.

Leu has formed friendships over the years and shared that 15 of his charges have died from COVID-19.

Family Services Agency Volunteers
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Family Services Agency volunteers stayed in touch with City of Santa Barbara Housing Authority residents during the COVID-19 pandemic, delivering flowers and ensuring residents had access to the food, medicine and other necessities. (Photo by Family Services Agency)

“It was a tough time and especially tough not being able to have that personal touch,” he said.

Quintanar echoed the enormity of the challenges of the past three years.

“We are working to advocate for legislation so this never happens again,” he said. “Residents must not die alone.”

In some cases, when seniors are particularly isolated with no family nearby, the ombudsman is their only friend.

With funding from the California Department of Aging, Quintanar said his agency is having great success offering electronic pets to some residents. E-pets help them form attachment.

Quintanar said the FSA is always looking for volunteers.

“We provide training,” he said. “All you need is a passion for helping others.”

Another big part of the FSA’s work with older people involves therapy and support programs for carers, helping those who are often family members to juggle the demands of work and care for their own families.

The Family Services Agency Caregiver Support Group allows individuals to connect with others in similar situations. The FSA also provides guidance to help caregivers balance multiple pressures while emphasizing the importance of self-care and directing individuals to appropriate community resources to best meet their needs.

For more information about volunteer opportunities as a Long-Term Care Ombudsman, call 805.922.1236 or email [email protected].

In addition to the Family Service Agency, the Senior Outreach & Assistance Consortium which served seniors during COVID-19 included Carpinteria children’s project, Center for Successful Aging, Central Coast Commission for the Elderly, Communicate, Community Partners in Caring, Cuyama Valley Family Resource CenterFSA Small house at the edge of the park, Lompoc Valley Community Health Care Organization, Lompoc Valley Medical Center and Santa Ynez Valley people help people.

Click here for more information about the Family Services Agency. Click here to donate online.

– Ann Pieramici is a contributing writer for Noozhawk. She can be reached at [email protected].

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Family Service Society of Yonkers to facilitate placement in affordable municipal housing in Yonkers https://hilpers.org/family-service-society-of-yonkers-to-facilitate-placement-in-affordable-municipal-housing-in-yonkers/ Sat, 14 May 2022 14:07:11 +0000 https://hilpers.org/family-service-society-of-yonkers-to-facilitate-placement-in-affordable-municipal-housing-in-yonkers/ The Family Service Society of Yonkers (FSSY) is partnering with the Municipal Housing Authority of the City of Yonkers (MHACY) on a joint mission to help related families looking for affordable housing. In this cooperative effort, related families (headed by grandparents raising children in the absence of their biological parents) seeking affordable housing in Yonkers […]]]>

The Family Service Society of Yonkers (FSSY) is partnering with the Municipal Housing Authority of the City of Yonkers (MHACY) on a joint mission to help related families looking for affordable housing. In this cooperative effort, related families (headed by grandparents raising children in the absence of their biological parents) seeking affordable housing in Yonkers will receive local preference alongside other groups such as the disabled, veterans and the homeless, which will make them eligible for priority. placement in affordable housing and receipt of Section 8 vouchers. MHACY intake forms to determine their eligibility for both municipal housing and Section 8 vouchers.

There are more than 1,450 grandparents in Yonkers raising grandchildren because their parents are unable to. The FSSY Kinship Support Program helps 50 of these families. More than 90% of them belong to the low and extremely low income categories, and 96% are women, most of whom are single grandmothers.

Helen Frankel, Executive Director of the FSSY, says, “Caregivers take on the responsibility of raising children when many can barely afford to make ends meet and have inadequate housing. Most are very low-income single grandmothers who have taken on the care of traumatized children because their parents cannot provide for them. We are very pleased to partner with MHACY to provide family carers with the help they need and hope that other municipalities will also consider taking similar steps to provide adequate and safe housing for related families.

Wilson Kimball, President and CEO, City of Yonkers Municipal Housing, said, “MHACY’s past and current relationship with FSSY and its resident coordinators has been very rewarding for our tenants and staff. We look forward to partnering with FSSY on this much-needed new service to an incredibly large population. »

FSSY GrandPower Advocates identified the critical need for more affordable housing for related families and advocated for the expansion of affordable housing options for them. According to Sylvia Gaynor, a family caregiver and member of FSSY’s GrandPower Advocacy Project, “Family caregivers face many unique challenges in finding safe and affordable housing in which to raise our children. Many of us are seniors with very few financial resources, and some of us live in seniors’ residences. After taking responsibility for our grandchildren, we no longer qualify for this senior housing and have to move, which we cannot afford. We are very happy that our situation is finally resolved in Yonkers.

Housing is the most difficult issue facing Kinship Support Program staff due to the limited amount of affordable housing – subsidized or on the open market – available for caregivers. Many of these families remain in overcrowded and derelict housing because they cannot afford to move. The COVID-19 outbreak has presented even greater challenges to these kinship families.

The housing preference for related families headed by grandparents will allow some of these families to obtain placement in municipal housing or Section 8 vouchers. Although this will not solve all the problems that related families face, having adequate and safe housing will go a long way towards creating stable and caring families in which to raise the children of relatives.

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service agency puts much-needed focus on youth mental well-being | Good for Santa Barbara https://hilpers.org/service-agency-puts-much-needed-focus-on-youth-mental-well-being-good-for-santa-barbara/ Sun, 08 May 2022 00:30:00 +0000 https://hilpers.org/service-agency-puts-much-needed-focus-on-youth-mental-well-being-good-for-santa-barbara/ [Noozhawk’s note: Second in a series sponsored by the Hutton Parker Foundation. Click here for the first story.] Mental health issues in children, teens, and young adults were a problem even before the COVID-19 pandemic altered nearly every aspect of life. For many young people, their world was turned upside down as home became school […]]]>

[Noozhawk’s note: Second in a series sponsored by the Hutton Parker Foundation. Click here for the first story.]

Mental health issues in children, teens, and young adults were a problem even before the COVID-19 pandemic altered nearly every aspect of life.

For many young people, their world was turned upside down as home became school and social isolation alienated them from the friendships so essential for growth and connection.

As schools have reopened and life resumed, the lingering impact of COVID-19 remains, with alarming numbers of young people struggling with feelings of anxiety, depression, panic attacks, mental disorders diet and suicidal ideation.

the Opinion of the American Surgeon General on the decline in youth mental health during the pandemic highlights the issues that family service agency – which includes the Santa Maria Valley Youth and Family Center and Guadalupe’s Small house at the edge of the park — and other youth-serving organizations are seeing cases throughout Santa Barbara County.

coinciding with Mental Health Awareness Month in May, the Family Service Agency, or FSA, planned several events to educate the community and raise awareness of the organization’s abilities to support people with mental or behavioral health issues.

The FSA has joined the Mental Wellness Center and YouthWell for four years to offer Youth Mental Health First Aid adult training. Free virtual training teaches adults how to recognize, understand and respond appropriately to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders.

Just as CPR helps those without clinical training help someone who is having a heart attack, Mental Health First Aid for Youth teaches participants the skills needed to interact with a young person in mental health crisis. , through a five-step action plan that ultimately connects youth to appropriate resources.

More than 2.5 million people nationwide are certified mental health first aiders, and that number continues to grow.

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Family Services Agency staff use play therapy methods when working with young children. (Photo by Family Services Agency)

Over the past three years, the FSA, Mental Wellness Center and YouthWell have certified more than 1,600 parents, mental health providers, educators and other YMHFA school staff.

There’s also a new evidence-based curriculum in teen mental health for students in grades 10-12 that offers similar training, teaching students how to identify a mental health issue in themselves. themselves or with their friends, and connect their peers to the appropriate resources.

“It’s a newer program that we’re currently testing,” said FSA executive director Lisa Brabo. “We are encouraged by the early results and hope that the more people we educate about mental health, the more we can help.”

FSA also organizes its annual fundraiser on May 12 at Santa Barbara Women’s Clubat 670 Mission Canyon Road, with an evening with Dr. Sarah Vinson.

An esteemed youth and child psychiatrist, Vinson is co-editor of (In)Social Justice and Mental Health and Pediatric Mental Health for Primary Care Providers.

She will be presenting on the topic of supporting youth mental health. Sponsorships and in-person tickets are available for purchase, and the FSA also offers free live streaming as a public service to educate and advocate for greater mental health awareness.

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Local youth are encouraging adults to take Mental Health First Aid for Youth training. (Photo by Family Services Agency)

“One of the biggest challenges impacting the mental health crisis is the lack of therapists,” Brabo explained. “There just aren’t enough therapists willing to take jobs to get us out of this crisis.”

While those most in need are never turned away, the FSA has created new types of interventions for less serious cases.

“Sometimes all you need is a connection,” Brabo told Noozhawk.

The FSA helps facilitate hiking and other affinity groups, and also offers peer counseling and an ombudsman program for seniors.

Additionally, the FSA continues to work with students through a long-standing partnership with local school districts, providing school mental health counseling in elementary and secondary schools. These services have been expanded during the pandemic to provide teacher training and support.

Results show positive improvements in overall quality of life, decreased likelihood of high-risk behaviors and depression, and improved student academic achievement.

Young children and their parents or guardians can enroll in FSA’s play therapy and for families dealing with difficult issues such as substance abuse or neglect, FSA offers intensive in-home therapy.

There are support groups and counseling for almost every family dynamic, and last year alone, more than 400 people received thousands of hours of mental health counseling.

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The Family Service Agency provides school-based counseling in 37 schools in Santa Barbara County. (Photo by Family Services Agency)

The FSA is dedicated to advancing mental health throughout the county and keeping up to date with the latest treatment options. The organization recently completed its participation in the National Council for Mental Wellbeing Resilience-Focused and Trauma-Informed Learning Community 2021-2022. The year-long learning community has placed FSA in a cohort with organizations from across the country.

“The Learning Community has been a great opportunity for us to strengthen our existing practices and policies and reaffirm our commitment to our clients and the community, to be a truly trauma-informed and resiliency-focused organization,” said Nancy Ranck, senior FSA. director of the behavioral health program.

Click here for more information about the Family Services Agency. Click here to donate online.

Click here for more information on ticketing and virtual access to the Vinson event. Produces support programs for underserved children, families and seniors.

There is an upcoming YMHFA training on May 21 and will focus on camp counselors and other youth programs. Face-to-face training resumes in June. The course is free for residents of Santa Barbara County. To register, visit BetheDifferenceSB.orgor call 805.884.8440.

– Ann Pieramici is a contributing writer for Noozhawk. She can be reached at [email protected].

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Utah Senator Orrin Hatch remembers his faith, family and service https://hilpers.org/utah-senator-orrin-hatch-remembers-his-faith-family-and-service/ Fri, 06 May 2022 23:03:45 +0000 https://hilpers.org/utah-senator-orrin-hatch-remembers-his-faith-family-and-service/ Brent Hatch, son of former U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch, wipes his tears during his father’s funeral at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Institute of Religion adjacent to the University of Utah in Salt Lake City on Friday. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News) Estimated reading time: 5-6 minutes SALT LAKE CIY — Family, friends […]]]>

Brent Hatch, son of former U.S. Senator Orrin Hatch, wipes his tears during his father’s funeral at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Institute of Religion adjacent to the University of Utah in Salt Lake City on Friday. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

Estimated reading time: 5-6 minutes

SALT LAKE CIY — Family, friends and colleagues celebrated the life of Senator Orrin Hatch on Friday, reflecting on his legacy of public service, devotion to family, love of people and devotion to God.

There were many laughs among tears as speakers shared stories not only of his many years as a U.S. senator, but also as a husband, father, and friend during service at the Institute of Religion in the United States. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake. City.

“He was really larger than life,” said his daughter Marcia Hatch Whetton.

Among the hundreds of people gathered for the funeral were current and former political leaders from the United States and Utah, including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, and leaders from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, including President Dallin H. Oaks, First Counselor in the First Presidency.

Hatch, the longest-serving Republican in the U.S. Senate and the longest-serving senator from Utah, died April 23 at age 88. He was first elected in 1976 and served 42 years in the Senate until retiring after his seventh term in 2019.

He received full military honors outside the institute building before a funeral procession traveled to Newton in Cache County, where Hatch will be buried in the hometown of his wife, Elaine. Governor Spencer Cox presented Elaine Hatch with the flag that had draped her husband’s casket at the funeral.

Much of the 90-minute memorial service focused on Hatch as a person, not a politician. Speakers told anecdotes about his kindness to strangers, his sense of humor, his hard work and his frugality. They also talked about his deep faith in Jesus Christ and his attachment to his religion.

“He was truly a friend to so many people,” Whetton said. “He often spoke about how much he loved this country, the State of Utah and all the people of Utah, and he truly felt it was an honor to serve.”

Hatch’s son Brent Hatch said his father had lived two lives – his own and one for his older brother Jesse, who was killed in World War II. Orrin Hatch was so shocked by the news of his brother’s death that it caused a white streak in his hair that never went away, Brent Hatch has said. It was a constant reminder of his commitment to his brother.

“He lived an amazing life. He wasn’t perfect but he never gave up. He really lived his life as a life together.” says Brent Hatch.

McConnell said Hatch is committed to bipartisan efforts to uplift the vulnerable, pointing to acts passed to help children’s health insurance, disabled Americans, generic drugs, HIV/AIDS and the lifeline against suicide.

“Orrin brought his legislation to the same place where our Savior took his ministry: to the margins, to the periphery, to the service of the ‘least of them,'” he said.

Hatch was famous for the prolific handwritten thank you notes he sent to all sorts of people, including Utah Jazz players for a big win. He said the grades reflected his respect for everyone’s dignity.

“A lot of Orrin’s character is captured in that habit,” McConnell said.

Elaine Hatch, wife of former U.S. Senator Orrin G. Hatch, talks to Governor Spencer Cox as he presents her with the flag that was draped over her husband's casket as the Hatches' son Jess s attends funeral services at Jesus Friday Church, the Institute of Religion of Christ of Latter-day Saints adjacent to the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.
Elaine Hatch, wife of former U.S. Senator Orrin G. Hatch, talks to Governor Spencer Cox as he presents her with the flag that was draped over her husband’s casket as the Hatches’ son Jess s attends funeral services at Jesus Friday Church, the Institute of Religion of Christ of Latter-day Saints adjacent to the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. (Photo: Laura Seitz, Deseret News)

The notes were also indicative of Hatch’s legislation, McConnell said. “Each bill was an Orrin Hatch thank you note to our nation,” he said.

Hatch never looked down on anyone, and more likely would have shared a hot dog with a guy and talked for hours, McConnell said.

Hatch’s affinity for Costco hot dogs because they’re cheap is well known. Whetton said his father’s favorite restaurant was Chuck-A-Rama, an all-you-can-eat buffet in Utah. He even took VIPs to eat there. And he always told his diners to eat plenty so they got their money’s worth, she said.

President Dallin H. Oaks, First Counselor in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, speaks with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky before the start of the funeral of the 'Former Sen. Orrin Hatch at Latter-day Saints' Institute of Religion next to the University of Utah in Salt Lake City on Friday.  Hatch, the longest-serving Republican in the U.S. Senate and the longest-serving senator from Utah, died April 23 at age 88.
President Dallin H. Oaks, First Counselor in the First Presidency of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, speaks with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky before the start of the funeral of the ‘Former Sen. Orrin Hatch at Latter-day Saints’ Institute of Religion next to the University of Utah in Salt Lake City on Friday. Hatch, the longest-serving Republican in the U.S. Senate and the longest-serving senator from Utah, died April 23 at the age of 88. (Photo: Kristin Murphy, Deseret News)

Former Oregon senator Gordon Smith recalled taking Hatch to a draper in London to buy a new suit to help him regain the title a magazine gave him as the best member dressed in Congress. When he learned it would cost £2,000, he called off the deal and said he would get the title back with the help of Mr. Mac, a Salt Lake City clothing store known for outfitting the Latter-day Saint missionaries.

Smith said it was not inevitable or predictable that Hatch would become one of the nation’s top lawmakers. He had no government experience when he came to Washington and early on had a reputation as a conservative ideologue. Every lawmaker faces a choice about what kind of lawmaker they will be, from noisemaker to negotiator to peacemaker, he said.

“Certainly, Orrin has made his share of noise,” he said. “But Orrin had the humility and wisdom to also be a student of the Senate. It made him listen and learn.”

Hatch had an “ecumenical heart,” Smith said. Although devoted to his faith, he respected the beliefs of others.

“Orrin’s love for God led him to be active in loving his neighbors while keeping the First and Second Great Commandments,” he said, adding that he had personally seen the compassion from Hatch in the form of letters, songs he had composed, and long walks after death. of one of his children.

The funeral procession for former U.S. Senator Orrin G. Hatch moves along Foothill Driver on Friday after the funeral service at the Institute of Religion of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints adjacent to the University from Utah to Salt Lake City.
The funeral procession for former U.S. Senator Orrin G. Hatch moves along Foothill Driver on Friday after the funeral service at the Institute of Religion of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints adjacent to the University from Utah to Salt Lake City. (Photo: Laura Seitz, Deseret News)

“Orrin was not a perfect man, just an extraordinarily good man,” Smith said.

President Oaks said he first met Hatch 50 years ago. Both of their families were from pioneer backgrounds and settled in what is now Vernal in southeastern Utah in 1879. Back then it was known as Hatchtown, a-t -he declares.

“What happened to Orrin Hatch after our first meeting 50 years ago is well known and already reviewed,” President Oaks said. “I only add our long-standing friendship and frequent contact and work on matters of common and public concern. Now, born two years apart and tracing our ancestry to the same small town in Utah, Orrin and I are coming together for what I like to call The Orrin G. Hatch Mortality Graduation, with the highest honors.”

Cox noted that there were 1 million people in Utah when Hatch was elected and 3 million when he retired. This puts “the depth and breadth of his service into perspective,” Cox said.

“For a lot of people across the country, what they know about Utah is Senator Hatch, their interactions with him. And I don’t think there is anyone, if we had to choose someone, that I would rather represent the state for this long, in so many different ways,” the governor told reporters before the funeral.

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Denis Romboy

Dennis Romboy is an editor and reporter for the Deseret News. He’s covered a variety of beats over the years, including state and local government, social issues, and the courts. Originally from Utah, Romboy earned a degree in journalism from the University of Utah. He enjoys cycling, snowboarding and running.

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Rooted in Santa Barbara’s Past, Family Services Agency Adapts to Its Present and Future | Good for Santa Barbara https://hilpers.org/rooted-in-santa-barbaras-past-family-services-agency-adapts-to-its-present-and-future-good-for-santa-barbara/ Mon, 02 May 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://hilpers.org/rooted-in-santa-barbaras-past-family-services-agency-adapts-to-its-present-and-future-good-for-santa-barbara/ [Noozhawk’s note: First in a series sponsored by the Hutton Parker Foundation.] The association family service agency has served Santa Barbara County for 123 years. It opened in 1899 with one employee and a few volunteers providing eight families with food, clothing, firewood and financial support. Although needs have changed over the past century, the […]]]>

[Noozhawk’s note: First in a series sponsored by the Hutton Parker Foundation.]

The association family service agency has served Santa Barbara County for 123 years. It opened in 1899 with one employee and a few volunteers providing eight families with food, clothing, firewood and financial support.

Although needs have changed over the past century, the Family Services Agency’s commitment remains vital and unwavering, responding to community challenges as they emerge. Today, the FSA has 234 experienced professionals who assist nearly 28,000 people in five county locations.

The Constitution of Associated Charities, as it was historically known, represented Santa Barbara County’s first organized social service agency. Over the decades, the charity has grown while helping Santa Barbara residents across the Great Depressionthe 1925 earthquake and the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic. In fact, in 1919, Associated Charities converted its original adobe wing into an emergency hospital to treat the flu.

By 1920, 345 families were served by the agency, which positioned itself as a safeguard to ensure that no poverty or avoidable suffering persisted without relief.

This fundamental principle continued to guide the Family Services Agency, which it was renamed in May 1953 to recognize its transition from a group-oriented to a family-service-oriented agency. It was during this time that the agency expanded its counseling services to children, families and couples, reflecting the increase in the number of working mothers, the high cost of living and the mobility of families.

“It’s the adaptability of the agency,” said executive director Lisa Brabo, “that explains its longevity.”

During the second half of the 1950s and early 1960s, family life changed again, creating a new model of social work that focused on “rebuilding family life, understanding parent-child relationships, and offering all manner of benefits to young and old,” as described in a 1956 annual meeting address.

This philosophy would inspire the FSA’s current mission: “to strengthen and advocate for families and individuals of all ages and diversities, helping to create and sustain a healthy community”.

This healthy community expanded in the 1960s to serve residents of Carpinteria, Lompoc and Santa Maria, while new programs were developed to help the elderly, a target audience served by the family services agency of today.

milk youth
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As early as 1917, low-income Santa Barbara families struggling with malnutrition, tuberculosis, and diabetes received fresh milk through the FSA’s Family Milk Fund. Social workers who made deliveries helped with meal planning and budgeting, continuing the program until 1946. (Family Services Agency file photo)

The FSA would come to strengthen ties with these communities, eventually merging with the Santa Maria Valley Youth & Family Center in 2017, and Guadalupe’s Small house at the edge of the park in 2019.

The Family Service Agency was forced to sell its original adobe house in 1980 due to declining funding from federal sources and the United Way of Santa Barbara County. It moved into the De la Vina Street space before eventually settling in its current location at 123 W. Gutierrez St., the site of the iconic former institution, the Talk of the Town restaurant.

The sale of the property brought new sources of income and an upsurge in volunteers. It was also around this time that a community working group identified the need for youth mental health services, as the country saw an increase in suicide rates among young children and violent crimes committed by young people. .

Clinical care in Santa Barbara was unaffordable for most, forcing the FSA to establish a referral clinic for children. This clinic would lead to long-standing contracts with local school districts to provide on-site counseling to children and their families, a partnership that is thriving more than 40 years later.

The Family Services Agency is now in seven school districts, serving 38 elementary schools, 13 middle schools and eight high schools, reaching 650 students. All of the students surveyed who received treatment showed a reduction in symptoms of depression.

This ability to identify community needs and develop programs to meet those needs is fundamental to FSA. More recently, the organization helped the community overcome the challenges resulting from the 2017 edition Thomas Firethe deadly 2018 Montecito Flash Floods and Debris Flowsand COVID-19.

Agricultural workers
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The Guadalupe Parent Changers group sewed and distributed masks for North County farm workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Family Services Agency)

“During COVID, all of our basic services were needed,” Brabo said.

People were grappling – many for the first time – with declining income, difficulty navigating between childcare and remote learning, and an increase in mental health issues. Older people and their caregivers have also experienced a lack of support while isolated at home.

“The problem with COVID is that it’s not a short-term problem,” Brabo explained. “It’s cumulative. We dig into two years of trouble as people are still behind on bills, rent and school as mental health issues have skyrocketed.

When farmworkers needed quarantine space, the FSA secured hotel rooms through its Housing for the Harvest program, providing safe isolation while staying in constant contact with family.

When parents needed more help because the children were home from school, the FSA set up a parental coaching call service staffed by bilingual educators.

When the elderly stayed at homeFSA provided food and friendship.

Dorothy Jackson Family Resource Center
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The Family Service Agency’s Dorothy Jackson Family Resource Center in Lompoc has become a weekly food distribution center for the community during the COVID-19 crisis. (Photo by Family Services Agency)

And the FSA has expanded its partnerships with organizations such as Santa Barbara County Food BankCentraide and the Mental Wellness Center to help address financial, medical and mental health challenges, always collaborating to avoid duplication of effort.

It’s no surprise that the FSA was recently honored as the 2022 Public Health Champion, so recognized for the agency’s ability to work collaboratively, show leadership and demonstrate sensitivity while improving the health status of local residents.

With over a century of experience, FSA has a rich history that has set a framework for its future, as well as extraordinary partnerships with public entities, non-profit organizations, schools, corporations, private foundations and donors who have enabled FSA to amplify its impact, helping to stabilize and strengthen our community.

Click here for more information about the Family Services Agency. Click here to donate online.

– Ann Pieramici is a contributing writer for Noozhawk. She can be reached at [email protected].

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Manulife Hong Kong partners with Christian Family Service Center to support older people’s health recovery and build resilience https://hilpers.org/manulife-hong-kong-partners-with-christian-family-service-center-to-support-older-peoples-health-recovery-and-build-resilience/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 07:45:00 +0000 https://hilpers.org/manulife-hong-kong-partners-with-christian-family-service-center-to-support-older-peoples-health-recovery-and-build-resilience/ End-to-End Healthcare Initiative Shows Manulife’s Commitment to Helping Vulnerable Seniors Safely Access Medical Services at Home HONG KONG, April 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Manulife Hong Kong is supporting single seniors and couples with limited family support, or those with mobility challenges, by partnering with the Christian Family Service Center (“CFSC”) to launch a care program […]]]>

End-to-End Healthcare Initiative Shows Manulife’s Commitment to Helping Vulnerable Seniors Safely Access Medical Services at Home

HONG KONG, April 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Manulife Hong Kong is supporting single seniors and couples with limited family support, or those with mobility challenges, by partnering with the Christian Family Service Center (“CFSC”) to launch a care program healthcare with flexible end-to-end medical care services. The Manulife Health Resilience program for seniors[1] (the “Program”) aims to provide 1,000 online medical consultations for seniors targeted in the first phase, with end-to-end support to help them rebuild their health at home. The program includes online consultations with Chinese and Western doctors and drug delivery.


Damien Green (2nd from left), CEO of Manulife Hong Kong and Macao, and Ivan Chan (1st from left), agency director of the company, as well as Kitty Chau (1st from right), assistant executive director of the Christian Family Service Centre, visit an elderly resident in her home where they see her participate in an online medical consultation as part of the new “Manulife Health Resilience Program for Seniors” .

Manulife is partnering with CFSC to respond quickly and decisively to the fifth wave of COVID-19 which has had a devastating effect on the medical needs and recovery of seniors in hong kong. The program, funded by the Manulife Charitable Foundation, will help seniors build resilience and provide them with health care support tailored to their needs during the pandemic. Manulife is committed to supporting sustainable health and well-being in order to have a positive impact on the hong kong community.

The program will start in May 2022 and run to April 2023. The CFSC team will help identify and reach single seniors and couples with low mobility in two of the that of Hong Kong districts with the highest incidence of poverty[2] and which also have some of the highest concentrations of older people — Kwun Tong and Wong Tai Sin.

“As a trusted brand and a leader in health protection, Manulife has always strived to support sustainable health and well-being in hong kong. Today, we continue to invest in initiatives that help people make healthier choices easier and more accessible. Manulife Health’s resilience program for seniors aims to help disadvantaged communities recover from public health emergencies. It will also help speed up that of Hong Kong recovery from the devastating fifth wave of the pandemic,” said Mr. Damien GreenCEO of Manulife Hong Kong and Macau. “Building on Manulife’s expertise, we are pleased to once again partner with CFSC to deliver this meaningful initiative to help local senior residents rebuild their health and lives. This program allows seniors to access the medical support they need most with flexibility and convenience. without worrying about financial stress.”

During the fifth wave of the pandemic, elderly residents received less attention for their heightened medical needs and mental well-being. In some cases, the situation was even worse for those with limited family support. Moreover, given the relatively low vaccination rate among the elderly, many of them worried about the health risks of leaving their homes and were therefore housebound. The program will help the elderly community rebuild their health and resilience in the face of the recent wave of the pandemic.

Aided by the CFSC project team or Manulife volunteers on site with digital devices, seniors will receive in-home assistance to arrange medical consultations online through digital communication tools with doctors in the CFSC network . The online consultations will be conducted with practitioners of Chinese or Western medicine with the help of the CFSC team. After consultations, CFSC project staff or Manulife volunteers will help deliver prescription drugs directly to the doorsteps of those in need, providing a one-stop service that will ease the minds of seniors. The CFSC project team will also monitor the physical and mental health conditions of the elderly and refer them for further medical treatment if necessary.

Kwok Lit-tung, JP, CFSC General Manageradded, “Once again, we are thrilled and grateful to be partnering with Manulife to roll out this program and support communities in need. hong kong. When the fifth wave started, Manulife immediately contacted our center to provide free rapid antigen test kits to help local families who are experiencing financial hardship. Sharing the same Manulife commitment to improving community well-being and building a healthy city, we will continue to support the disadvantaged, especially vulnerable seniors, with extensive care and assistance. Through partnerships with different organizations such as Manulife, CFSC strives to support the groups that need it most. »

Since the start of the pandemic, Manulife has donated thousands of face masks and hand sanitizers to the community. Manulife also launched the first-ever company-sponsored charitable health insurance voucher program, the “Manulife Health Insurance Voucher Program”, with CFSC, benefiting 2,000 low-income families. Manulife combines its expertise with social investments and its strength in volunteerism to create lasting positive impact that strengthens and reinforces a hong kong community.

[1] Among users of CFSC services who are 60 years of age or older and who require assistance.

[2] Hong Kong Poverty Situation Report 2020, by the Hong Kong SAR Government.

About Manulife Hong Kong

Manulife Hong Kong, through Manulife International Holdings Limited, owns Manulife (International) Limited, Manulife Investment Management (hong kong) Limited and Manulife Provident Funds Trust Company Limited. As a member of the Manulife group of companies, Manulife Hong Kong offers a diverse range of wealth protection and management products and services to individuals and businesses in hong kong and Macau.

About Manulife

Manulife Financial Corporation is a leading international provider of financial services that helps people make decisions easier and live better lives. With our global headquarters in Toronto, Canadawe provide financial advice and insurance, operating as Manulife in Canada, Asia and Europe, and principally as John Hancock in the United States. Through Manulife Investment Management, the global brand for our global wealth and asset management business, we serve individuals, institutions and pension plan members around the world. Our main activities are in Asia and Canada, and the United States, where we have been serving our customers for over 155 years. We trade as “MFC” on the Toronto, New York and Philippine stock exchanges and as “945” in Hong Kong. Over the past 12 months, we have issued C$31.8 billion in payments to our customers.

Not all offers are available in all jurisdictions. For more information, please visit manulife.com.

About the Christian Family Service Center

The Christian Family Service Center (CFSC) was established in 1954. Over the years, the Agency has grown into a one-stop agency, offering services nationwide. CFSC has 10 core services with 2 categories, (i) “Person Centered Service” includes Child and Family Services, Youth and Education Services, Aged Care Services , disability services, mental health services; (ii) “Community Focused Service” includes Active Aging Services, Disability Opportunities and Inclusion, Medical and Health Services, Community Development Services, Environmental Protection and Green Living . For more information on CFSC, please visit www.cfsc.org.hk.

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Family Services Agency event highlights youth mental health needs | Good for Santa Barbara https://hilpers.org/family-services-agency-event-highlights-youth-mental-health-needs-good-for-santa-barbara/ Wed, 13 Apr 2022 03:29:00 +0000 https://hilpers.org/family-services-agency-event-highlights-youth-mental-health-needs-good-for-santa-barbara/ Posted on April 12, 2022 | 8:29 p.m. Dr. Sarah Y. Vinson Coinciding with Mental Health Awareness Month in May, the Santa Barbara County Family Services Agency (FSA) will host its annual fundraiser featuring Dr. Sarah Y. Vinson, Youth Psychiatrist and children, addressing the topic of supporting the mental health of young people. The event […]]]>

Posted on April 12, 2022
| 8:29 p.m.

Dr. Sarah Y. Vinson

Coinciding with Mental Health Awareness Month in May, the Santa Barbara County Family Services Agency (FSA) will host its annual fundraiser featuring Dr. Sarah Y. Vinson, Youth Psychiatrist and children, addressing the topic of supporting the mental health of young people. The event will take place from 5-8:30 p.m. on May 12 at the Santa Barbara Woman’s Club in Rockwood.

The FSA will also make a live version of the event available to the public free of charge.

Proceeds from event support programs for underserved children, families and seniors, including family support services, school-based counselling, youth behavioral health and seniors mental health counselling/ caregivers, provided by the FSA, the Santa Maria Valley Youth and Family Center and Guadalupe’s Little House at the edge of the park.

“As a youth-serving organization, we see the impacts of this youth mental health crisis on children, parents, teachers and the entire community,” said Lisa Brabo, CEO of the Family. Service Agency. “This event provides an opportunity for community members to take a step forward in becoming more informed and united in supporting the mental health of our young people.”

A recent advisory, issued by the US Surgeon General, underscores the urgency of addressing the youth mental health crisis during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The FSA and other youth-serving organizations are feeling this urgency in situations across Santa Barbara County. More and more children and adolescents are experiencing emotional well-being issues, including documented increases in anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation.

The FSA invites the community to hear Dr Vinson speak about the crisis and how to support young people’s mental health.

Dr. Vinson has been featured in national media such as PBS Newshour, The Guardian, Washington Times and The Roland Martin Show. She has been a guest speaker at national meetings such as the American Psychiatric Association and the School Based Health Alliance.

Dr. Vinson has received awards in recognition of her service and leadership, including the Outstanding Young Alumni Award from the University of Florida College of Medicine and the Jeanne Spurlock Minority Fellowship Alumna Achievement Award.

Tickets for the in-person reception and presentation are $150 and can be purchased at fsacares.org/sarah-vinson.

The event is sponsored by Tania and John Burke, Marni and Michael Cooney, Santa Barbara Foundation, Ginny and Tim Bliss, Zora and Les Charles, Montecito Bank & Trust, Union Bank, Jill and John Bishop, Ginny and Tim Bliss, Dignity Health , Tisha Ford, Jane and Fred Sweeney, Carole MacElhenny, Liz and Andrew Butcher, and CenCal Health. For a full list of sponsors, visit fsacares.org/sarah-vinson.

To learn more about the Santa Barbara County Family Services Agency, visit fsacares.org or call 805-965-1001.

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Jewish Family Service Receives Casino Reinvestment Development Authority Grant | Down the beach https://hilpers.org/jewish-family-service-receives-casino-reinvestment-development-authority-grant-down-the-beach/ Thu, 07 Apr 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://hilpers.org/jewish-family-service-receives-casino-reinvestment-development-authority-grant-down-the-beach/ MARGATE – Jewish Family Service of Atlantic & Cape May Counties received a $50,000 grant from the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority. Funds will be used for JFS’s Atlantic Homeless Alliance Travel Assistance Program, which connects individuals and families in Atlantic City experiencing homelessness to safe housing and other services required. Through this program, JFS staff […]]]>

MARGATE – Jewish Family Service of Atlantic & Cape May Counties received a $50,000 grant from the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority. Funds will be used for JFS’s Atlantic Homeless Alliance Travel Assistance Program, which connects individuals and families in Atlantic City experiencing homelessness to safe housing and other services required.

Through this program, JFS staff will help individuals reconnect with family, friends or a service provider. JFS staff join the person in a problem-solving conversation, then cover the cost of a bus, train or plane ticket. This emotional support and practical help makes the difference between remaining homeless in Atlantic City or securing viable housing.

“The generous funds provided by CRDA are essential to ensuring that JFS is able to continue to provide this key intervention to address homelessness in Atlantic City. By working in partnership with Atlantic County, Atlantic City and other community providers, JFS staff are able to reconnect individuals to their home communities and prevent homelessness,” said Andrea Steinberg. , CEO of JFS.

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In 2020, the Atlantic County Point-in-Time Count, an annual snapshot of the homeless population, showed that 95% of the county’s homeless population lives in Atlantic City. It also reported that almost a third of these people said their last permanent address was outside the county (Monarch Housing, 2020).

The AHA provides a single point of entry to help individuals and families who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. AHA staff develop a personalized support plan with the primary goal of addressing homelessness concerns and challenges. Since 2014, JFS has effectively provided travel assistance to people experiencing homelessness or housing instability in Atlantic City. From April 2020 to March 2021, the JFS Atlantic Homeless Alliance has helped 2,544 people with travel assistance, homelessness prevention, supportive housing, case management and more. In partnership with JFS’s Project Assistance Transition from Homelessness (PATH), the team provides skilled outreach services to homeless and chronically homeless people with serious mental illness to develop trusting relationships and provide support. .

“The JFS Travel Assistance program creates an economic advantage for Atlantic City by reducing the long-term public costs associated with homelessness,” said Modia Butler, Chairman of the Board of CRDA.

For more information on JFS programs and services, visit www.jfsatlantic.org or call 609-822-1108.

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Family Service Association of Redlands reviews year’s work and installs board members – Redlands Daily Facts https://hilpers.org/family-service-association-of-redlands-reviews-years-work-and-installs-board-members-redlands-daily-facts/ Tue, 05 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://hilpers.org/family-service-association-of-redlands-reviews-years-work-and-installs-board-members-redlands-daily-facts/ The Family Service Association of Redlands recently installed new board members and reviewed the past year’s work in a virtual meeting. State Senator Rosilicie Ochoa Bogh, who represents the 23rd District, installed the board members at the Feb. 22 meeting, and special guests included representatives from the San Manuel Mission Indian Band. and the Rippleworks […]]]>

The Family Service Association of Redlands recently installed new board members and reviewed the past year’s work in a virtual meeting.

State Senator Rosilicie Ochoa Bogh, who represents the 23rd District, installed the board members at the Feb. 22 meeting, and special guests included representatives from the San Manuel Mission Indian Band. and the Rippleworks Foundation, supporters and funders of the agency.

The new board members are Pam Allen, director of emergency services at Redlands Community Hospital; Pamela Allen Coleman, Senior Associate Director of Enrollment at the University of Redlands School of Business and Society; Barbara Rozema, event organizer and real estate agent; Joseph Shaw, real estate agent; Terry Vines, business owner and dentist; and Tyler Waner, Financial Advisor.

The new officers are Lori Hatfield, chair of the board; Gary Fagan, vice president of staff; Matt Miller, vice president of resource development; Diane Rémy, treasurer; and Christina Rivera, secretary.

At the meeting, Kyra Stewart, executive director of the Family Service Association, said the agency helped more families in 2021 than the previous year, with the number rising from 1,861 in 2020 to 2,147 in 2021.

“Families who had never needed support before were signing up for services in 2020 and 2021,” Stewart said in a press release.

“The reasons vary. School closures, the increased need for child care and increased costs, caregiving and job loss related to COVID-19 are all factors in our growth in numbers,” said Stewart said.

In 2021, Family Service provided 127 months’ rent to 105 families, including 35 homeless at the point of contact, according to the press release.

Due to a shortage of shelters in the area, homeless families receive motel vouchers in partnership with Family Service, 2-1-1, local police and the San County Sheriff’s Department Hope Team. Bernardino. More than 500 vouchers have been issued in 2021, and families facing eviction have also received emergency deposits to move in, with help from government and private donors, according to the press release.

Family Service continued its holiday programs in 2021, with the Adopt-a-Family program, led by Rod and Lori Shelffo, helping more than 200 families in need.

The agency also relaunched its breakfast program in the last quarter of 2021, serving more than 4,000 meals on its campus at 612 Lawton St.

Volunteers help run the breakfast program and help in other ways, and the agency’s 538 volunteers have contributed more than 6,000 hours of service, according to the news release.

Jill Prendergast, head of fund development for the agency, spoke about the agency’s fundraising events, including the annual Redlands Hunger Walk, scheduled for June 4 this year, and Dinner in the Grove. , scheduled for September 24.

Family Service Association of Redlands, founded in 1898 by Alfred Smiley, is a non-profit organization serving needy families in and around Redlands. It is supported primarily by private donations, direct mail campaigns and fundraising events.

For more information, visit redlandsfamilyservice.org or call 909-793-2673.

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