Family planning – Hilpers http://hilpers.org/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 10:47:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hilpers.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Family planning – Hilpers http://hilpers.org/ 32 32 45 million women do not have access to family planning and sexual and reproductive health services – Effiom https://hilpers.org/45-million-women-do-not-have-access-to-family-planning-and-sexual-and-reproductive-health-services-effiom/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 07:43:28 +0000 https://hilpers.org/45-million-women-do-not-have-access-to-family-planning-and-sexual-and-reproductive-health-services-effiom/ About 45 million women of childbearing age do not have access to family planning and sexual and reproductive health services in the country, said an international non-governmental organization, Marie Stopes Nigeria. Effiom Effiom, Country Director, Marie Stopes Nigeria, speaking in Abuja at a two-day workshop on sexual and reproductive health, organized by her organization in […]]]>

About 45 million women of childbearing age do not have access to family planning and sexual and reproductive health services in the country, said an international non-governmental organization, Marie Stopes Nigeria.

Effiom Effiom, Country Director, Marie Stopes Nigeria, speaking in Abuja at a two-day workshop on sexual and reproductive health, organized by her organization in collaboration with the Federal Ministry of Health, for leaders traditional and religious, explained that the lack of access to facilities for family planning and sexual and reproductive health services contributes to the high rates of maternal mortality in the country.

He added that the lack of commodities in health facilities, coupled with other traditional and religious barriers, had also led to high maternal mortality rates in the country.

The country director observed that the workshop was organized to educate traditional and religious leaders on critical issues affecting the provision and use of quality reproductive health services in the country.

Mamman Mahmuda, Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of Health, said traditional and religious leaders have a role to play in promoting advocacy and supporting demand creation for sexual and reproductive health services and rights for women. reduce maternal and child mortality in Nigeria.


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Address ‘cultural norms’ that contribute to gender-based violence https://hilpers.org/address-cultural-norms-that-contribute-to-gender-based-violence/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 06:21:24 +0000 https://hilpers.org/address-cultural-norms-that-contribute-to-gender-based-violence/ New Narissa fraser 4 hours ago The Family Planning Association said that certain factors that contribute to domestic violence have become “cultural norms” in Trinidad and Tobago and should be “addressed and eliminated”. In a press release issued Friday – International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women – the association called on the […]]]>

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The Family Planning Association said that certain factors that contribute to domestic violence have become “cultural norms” in Trinidad and Tobago and should be “addressed and eliminated”.

In a press release issued Friday – International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women – the association called on the nation to “look within …

“… Examine our governance structure, our laws, our society, our language, our policies and practices in institutions, workplaces and places of business as well as cultural practices and norms in communities and families to introspect and examine our own mindsets, attitudes and responses to abuse in all its forms.

He said that in TT, gender-based violence can be seen as a “manifestation of restrictive gender stereotypes, expectations of gender roles and the distribution of power between the sexes,” noting a recent upsurge in local cases.

“We continued to hear reports of female victims of homicides, victims of sexual assault between non-intimate partners and assaults related to gender-based violence against members of vulnerable communities, including the migrant community.

“Plus, we know that for every reported case there are many more unreported incidents.”

He said a collective effort is needed to tackle gender-based violence and more people need to “act” rather than just watch.

“The association joins the call to action across our country to not only recognize and recognize gender-based violence as a human rights violation, but also to conscientiously identify, address in concert and eliminate the contributing factors that have, in some cases, become cultural. standards. “

Over the next 13 days, the association will embark on an activism campaign.

“We will share more about our projects and services available to the public. In the meantime, we invite our fellow citizens: Do not sweep gender-based violence under the carpet. Don’t dismiss it as a standard. It’s not who we are as a people, and it’s not something we’re going to perpetuate.

“Violence against women and girls is not acceptable. Gender-based violence in any form is not acceptable. Rather than wait for change to take hold, let’s act together. Let us all stand up collectively as allies and implement the change we want to see in all corners of society today. “


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Desert Star Family Planning’s DeShawn Taylor, MD, M.Sc., FACOG joins Amici Curiae Brief opposing Mississippi’s 15-week abortion ban law https://hilpers.org/desert-star-family-plannings-deshawn-taylor-md-m-sc-facog-joins-amici-curiae-brief-opposing-mississippis-15-week-abortion-ban-law/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 18:57:00 +0000 https://hilpers.org/desert-star-family-plannings-deshawn-taylor-md-m-sc-facog-joins-amici-curiae-brief-opposing-mississippis-15-week-abortion-ban-law/ Taylor provides essential commentary based on his experience as an abortion provider and clinic owner PHOENIX, November 26, 2021 / PRNewswire / – DeShawn Taylor, MD, M.Sc., FACOG is one of a myriad of prominent abortion care supporters who weighed in on the recently submitted amicus curiae brief in response to the Mississippi A 15-week […]]]>

Taylor provides essential commentary based on his experience as an abortion provider and clinic owner

PHOENIX, November 26, 2021 / PRNewswire / – DeShawn Taylor, MD, M.Sc., FACOG is one of a myriad of prominent abortion care supporters who weighed in on the recently submitted amicus curiae brief in response to the Mississippi A 15-week abortion ban case in the United States Supreme Court on December 1, 2021. The Mississippi the law is currently blocked from being enacted, but the agreement of the United States Supreme Court to hear the case is troubling and may portend a disturbing turn of sentiment on this issue.

DeShawn Taylor, MD, M.Sc., FACOG en 12/1/21 SCOTUS amici curiae slip for Mississippi Abortion ban for 15 weeks.

Although various states have passed numerous laws restricting abortion, in most cases, upon appeal, the United States Supreme Court has refused to hear or ruled against the cases. However, the next Mississippi The case is remarkable in that it risks dismantling decades of precedent and represents the gravest opposition in Roe v. Wade to this day. Amid a landscape of growing anti-abortion laws, such as the recent 6-week ban on abortion in Texas SB 8, Roe v. Wade could potentially be overturned, decimating access to legal and safe abortion care afforded by this landmark decision.

DeShawn Taylor MD. is a Certified OB / GYN, Clinical Professor, Women’s Health and Reproductive Rights Advocate and Owner of Desert Star Family Planning at Phoenix, Arizona. Desert Star Family Planning offers fully integrated women’s health and sexual health services, including abortion.

As part of Taylor’s substantive commentary on the recently submitted amicus curiae brief to the United States Supreme Court regarding the Mississippi On a 15-week abortion ban, she recounted an anecdote that she was called to the hospital to treat a 22-week-pregnant mother of three who suffered from heart failure. Dr Taylor performed a life-saving abortion that improved the mother’s heart condition almost instantly, so the mother was able to join her family after just a few days.

“Abortion care saves lives; Taylor notes, “This is just part of the continuum of health care options that should be available, easily accessible, safe and legal for those who find themselves pregnant, and needs to be talked about in that context.” It shouldn’t be politicized, and it shouldn’t be separate from anything else a pregnant person might think of. “

Abortion providers face considerable opposition and barriers to providing abortion care, and Dr Taylor has, in his own words, “a trio of harassment triggers:” She’s black, that’s a woman and she provides abortion care. Although Dr Taylor had provided abortion care for 20 years, private practice had not been something she considered.

Taylor comments, “I felt there was a way to treat people when they seek abortion care. Over time, working in various delivery systems, it became clear that I wasn’t going to be able to create this for someone else. This is one of the reasons Desert Star Family Planning exists. “

Dr Taylor and his staff intended to create a unique safe space for those who may have had negative experiences seeking health care. The practice recently added gender-affirming care to provide hormone therapy for transgender people who wish to make a medical transition.

“All aspects of reproductive health care are intimate and vulnerable,” Taylor commented. “There are so many traumatic and oppressive experiences that people have to seek reproductive health care in general, not just those seeking abortion care. “

While Dr. Taylor dreamed of being a brain surgeon as a child, she discovered her passion for women’s health while studying medicine and decided to become an obstetrician / gynecologist.

Taylor notes, “It wasn’t really a problem whether I was providing abortion care or not. But when I started my training I discovered how polarizing it was, and with that came the realization that once you decide to perform abortion care, then you are automatically an advocate. . You can’t just provide care and you just can’t go to work… it’s something that must be a vital part of your life and close to your heart. “

ABOUT Dr. DeShawn Taylor, MD, MSc, FACOG Dr. DeShawn Taylor, is a certified gynecologist and family planning specialist, clinical professor and reproductive justice advocate who established the Desert Star Family Planning Clinic in Phoenix in 2013 and founded the Desert Star Institute for Family Planning, a nonprofit organization of which she is president, in 2017. Recognized in 2020 by the Maricopa County NAACP as a pioneer, Dr. Taylor is committed to provide an unwavering resource for family planning and sexual health care, a safe and welcoming space for queer, transgender, gender nonconforming and non-binary people, and an abortion training center. She is a trusted opinion leader on reproductive justice who shares her expertise with various national, state and local boards, committees and programs. She has co-authored academic publications and appeared in local and national television, print and digital media including Rewire News, Huffington Post, ABC 15, NBC 12, Arizona Republic, SELF Magazine and Bloomberg News. Dr Taylor received his MD from the David Geffen School of Medicine in UCLA. After completing postgraduate training in Obstetrics and Gynecology at King / Drew Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, she completed the scholarship in family planning at the University of Southern California where she also obtained a Master of Science in Clinical and Biomedical Investigations.

Contact: DeShawn Taylor, MD, M.Sc., FACOG
Telephone: 480-447-8857
Email: d.taylor@deserstarfp.org

Cision

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SOURCE Desert Star Family Planning


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Free family planning services in Byo https://hilpers.org/free-family-planning-services-in-byo/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 22:10:04 +0000 https://hilpers.org/free-family-planning-services-in-byo/ The Chronicle Lumbidzani Dima, columnistThe Zimbabwe National Family Planning Council (ZNFPC) offers free family planning services at its two clinics in Bulawayo. Jadelle insertion and removal, Implanon insertion and removal, HIV self-test for family planning clients and their partners as well as pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) which is a drug that is taken to prevent […]]]>

The Chronicle

Lumbidzani Dima, columnist
The Zimbabwe National Family Planning Council (ZNFPC) offers free family planning services at its two clinics in Bulawayo.

Jadelle insertion and removal, Implanon insertion and removal, HIV self-test for family planning clients and their partners as well as pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) which is a drug that is taken to prevent contracting

HIV, are offered free of charge at counseling clinics at Mpilo Central Hospital and Lister Clinic, located along Samuel Parirenyatwa Street.

The free services started yesterday and the program ends tomorrow.

The women who came for the free services at Lister Clinic yesterday said the services were really helpful as not everyone can afford family planning services as some of the things on offer go up to US $ 10.

Ms. Abigail Moyo (20) who came for the services said she had a child when she was still young because she could not access family planning services.

“I got pregnant at a young age because I didn’t have access to family planning services, so I want to avoid another mistake. I am happy that they are offering us free services because some of us cannot afford these services. This ZNFPC initiative will help reduce unwanted pregnancies, ”she said.

In an interview, Acting Provincial Director of ZNFPC Bulawayo, Ms. Janet Godzi, said she was aware that some people could not afford to pay for the services, which is why they offered free services.

“We are aware that there are people who cannot afford family planning services, so every once in a while we offer free services,” she said.

ZNFPC not only offers family planning services, but also provides free sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services.


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Nigeria: Putting Family Planning First – Lessons from Zimbabwe for Lagos State https://hilpers.org/nigeria-putting-family-planning-first-lessons-from-zimbabwe-for-lagos-state/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 04:38:59 +0000 https://hilpers.org/nigeria-putting-family-planning-first-lessons-from-zimbabwe-for-lagos-state/ Like many countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Nigeria continues to face challenges in meeting the health needs of its population, particularly in the area of ​​sexual and reproductive health. Despite cuts in funding from international development partners for family planning (FP) services and the revision of Nigeria’s Family Planning Master Plan (Extension Plan): 2014-2018 to Nigeria’s […]]]>

Like many countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Nigeria continues to face challenges in meeting the health needs of its population, particularly in the area of ​​sexual and reproductive health. Despite cuts in funding from international development partners for family planning (FP) services and the revision of Nigeria’s Family Planning Master Plan (Extension Plan): 2014-2018 to Nigeria’s Family Planning Master Plan 2020- 2024 currently revised, incorporating issues that have emerged since the initial plan was developed, there is no budget line for FP services and products in Nigeria’s 2022 budget. Considering that Nigeria is expected to become the third most populous country in the world by 2050, with an estimated population of over 400 million due to its annual growth rate of 2.6%, this calls into question the Continued commitment of the country to close the huge gaps in access to FP across the country.

Increasing funding and demand for FP services and products is essential because without it, FP services and products will not be demanded and made accessible. Recognizing the consequences of limited access to FP services, Nigeria Health Watch recently organized a policy dialogue to intensify conversations on the different ways Nigeria can improve its domestic resource mobilization for FP services. Speakers of the #FundFPNaija dialogue presented a business case for increasing private sector participation in financing FP services, highlighting potential benefits such as lower taxes for participating organizations, reduction in maternal mortality, increased income generation and health financing through earmarked taxes and efficient management of resources. Nigeria’s Family Planning Master Plan 2020-2024 has already highlighted that 80% of modern contraceptives are provided by the private sector.

Family planning in a new Lagos

Each year, September 8 is dedicated to World Contraception Day (WCD), to recognize the rights of couples and individuals to freely and responsibly decide the number and spacing of their births. In its pursuit of excellence in women’s health and empowerment, the Lagos State Ministry of Health and Lagos State Government, supported by the Post-Pregnancy Family Planning Project, the ‘Association of Former Students of the National Institute (AANI) -PACFaH @ Scale project (PAS) The project and other civil society organizations commemorated CMB 2021 with a policy dialogue on the theme “Family planning in a new Lagos: a catalytic pillar for women’s empowerment and socio-economic development ”. During the political dialogue, the First Lady of Lagos State, Her Excellency Dr Ibijoke Sanwo-Olu, said that despite the benefits of FP, it is disheartening to know that for many women the right to decide when or having children is hampered by the lack of access to a modern and safe method of contraception, because “many women in Lagos who wish to delay or avoid pregnancy are not currently using any form of modern contraception and our goal is is to reach these women, ”she added.

The business of women’s health

The return on investment of spending to increase access to contraception produces incredible benefits, both in terms of well-being, socio-economic impact and development for the state, which is why over the course of Over the past 18 months, the Lagos State government has ordered four modern day nurseries. centers for optimal service delivery.

Prof. Adesegun Fatusi, in his presentation, noted that contraceptive prevalence has gradually increased in Lagos but unevenly among different groups. With an annual CPR of 1.38% for the period 2014-2020, male condoms and implants remain the most widely used modern contraception. Fatusi pointed out that the use of traditional contraceptives is higher than for modern contraceptives, as around 68% of users seek contraceptives from local vendors. “People are using FP, but they are not using the most effective method,” he said. According to Professor Fatusi, the private sector, especially through community pharmacies (CPs) and patented and proprietary medicine vendors (PPMVs), are key access points for modern contraceptives for more than 65% of users to Lagos.

This is an important access point that the government can target for financial incentives to also improve the provision and access to FP services. The IntegratE project, a 4-year project funded by MSD for Mothers and implemented by a consortium led by the Society for Family Health (SFH) with the Federal Ministry of Health, piloted a 3-tier accreditation system, led by the Pharmacy Council of Nigeria (PCN) to test a task shifting model in Lagos and Kaduna. The objective was to allow increased access to FP products and services, particularly in rural areas where the informal private sector was already an important source for FP services.

The example of Zimbabwe

As the African continent continues to grapple with family planning challenges, there is an economic benefit if developing countries maintain investments in FP services, which could lead to a substantial decrease in unwanted pregnancies. For every dollar invested in contraceptive services, there is a savings of $ 3 in the cost of maternal, newborn and abortion care.

Zimbabwe, Botswana and Kenya were the first countries in sub-Saharan Africa to experience a fertility transition from 6.7 to 4.0 births per woman between 1984 and 2015. Over the past two decades, the Modern contraceptive prevalence (mtcp) for Zimbabwe has been estimated at 67 percent for all methods among married women and currently stands out as one of the highest in sub-Saharan Africa. Zimbabwe’s FP model is an outstanding African achievement that should be adopted by other countries.

Although Lagos State is not a country, it is similar in size to Zimbabwe and can adopt many structures present in their FP model. As the state prepares to achieve a comprehensive development agenda through access to FP, it can incorporate the following three approaches from the Zimbabwean model.

The Zimbabwean government has ensured the availability of FP services through a wide range of delivery points. The government has maintained and strengthened its FP service delivery programs from the tertiary hospital to community platforms in the public and private sectors. Mobile clinics, field health workers, health centers, private doctors, private hospitals / clinics have been deployed with the aim of reducing access to the provision of FP services. They have shown that the correct and ethical use of modern contraception has major social and life implications.

Zimbabwe’s ability to achieve an above-average CPRt for sub-Saharan Africa is a testament to the government’s desire to create an enabling environment that has helped FP programs thrive. Showing political will, the government of Zimbabwe has become a signatory to several international and regional conventions, including the International Conference on Population and Development and the Abuja Declaration, to which Nigeria is also a signatory. In addition, the government also revised the Marriage Law, and in 2016, a law was passed to raise the legal age of marriage from 16 to 18 for both boys and girls.

Finally, to help the government and partners to better understand the country’s budgetary needs in terms of FP over a given period, the government of Zimbabwe has defined the financial resource needs. Thus, FP financing gaps were identified, allowing the government and donor partners to strengthen their commitments through more targeted resource mobilization for the needs of the FP program over a period of 5 years.